The Pathos of Distance

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The Pathos of Distance

- Agile Minds in Perpetuum -


    transgressive grammar

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    Barracuda

    Posts : 151
    Join date : 2018-02-11
    Age : 353

    transgressive grammar

    Post by Barracuda on Wed Feb 21, 2018 2:37 pm

    So, Zoot do you want to do some vocals and guit-awr for a new music song?
    I can lay out a track with a beat and some bass and piano sections or something.
    We can call it Pathos of Distance. Or thats what we call the band. Or Pyhons of Distance.

    The Later Wittgensteins

    The Hypothetical Kierkegaard
    I think K suffered from the inability to decide, but not in a universal sense, but because he was an existentialist and in the world around him, in the objective reality, there was nothing to decide upon. Christ was overwhelming. Suffering was complete, the redemption the only thing to be occupied with, and since redemption is in all the poisons the soul gives to the spirit, he didn't want that. Nietzsches health was that he saw moments where he thought to hell with redemption, I want this. To hell, with I, I want this. Or rather, that. Da-sein. Super-man. They are related. Transgressive grammatical hints in the terms! Defcon.

    I was thinking about band-names. I remember.

    From the spirit of music nature is born into man, or rather a courage before nature, an indifference before its cruelty, a partaking in it, a form of perpetual laughter that propels human culture into its divine madnesses called morality and common sense. Ways to remember without knowing, ways of expecting the future with open arms - our divine culture, the West, needs to be preserved for this reason. Too ward off the shadow of death.

    So hey, do you want to make a song? In any case I will make one.


    _________________
    I do not want to be right. I want to believe in you. I want to believe that in this world there is someone who never lies, cheats or compromises, who is always noble. - ᛁᚹᚫᚱ

    Zoot Allures

    Posts : 525
    Join date : 2018-02-07
    Age : 500

    Re: transgressive grammar

    Post by Zoot Allures on Wed Feb 21, 2018 2:39 pm

    barracuda wrote:So Zoot do you want to do some vocals

    uh that's a negative, ghost rider.
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    Barracuda

    Posts : 151
    Join date : 2018-02-11
    Age : 353

    Re: transgressive grammar

    Post by Barracuda on Wed Feb 21, 2018 2:45 pm



    The part about Kierkegaard was quite inspired.


    _________________
    I do not want to be right. I want to believe in you. I want to believe that in this world there is someone who never lies, cheats or compromises, who is always noble. - ᛁᚹᚫᚱ

    Zoot Allures

    Posts : 525
    Join date : 2018-02-07
    Age : 500

    Re: transgressive grammar

    Post by Zoot Allures on Wed Feb 21, 2018 4:41 pm

    it's exceedingly difficult to capture kierkegaard's entire philosophy in even a book, much less a single post. he put the 'p' in prolific. he's about the only writer (that i know of) i can put beside nietzsche in complexity, style and breadth. if we had to summarize him without extensive analysis, we would just say that he was a gentle soul... even less vindictive than spinoza, and that's hard to be. his turn to christianity was a result of his placid soul, his softness, not his reasoning, for he admitted his leap was absurd. it's was a case of leaping in the wrong direction, that's all.

    but few philosophers possessed such nobility as kierkegaard. nietzsche and spinoza are the only other two that come to mind. the others were just thinkers. these three were sages in the highest degree.

    have you ever really read kierkegaard... ever entered into the machinery of his work? there is a plethora of wisdom and extraordinary insight throughout it. forget about the christianity... just look for the existentialism, the assault on hegel, and the radical philosophy of subjectivity, the penetrating psychology. he's called the father of existentialism for good reason (with dostoevsky in a close second place).

    and yes, it is about health in the end. kierkegaard wasn't the healthiest guy on the block. perhaps this is why he had the sharpest wit of them all and was a master of irony, unmatched by anyone... not even nietzsche. or voltaire for that matter.

    i remember when i settled down for a serious reading of either/or over fifteen years ago, and became so submerged in the work that i nearly lost myself. and even though it wasn't for me, i came to have an intimate understanding of why kierkegaard became that knight of faith. now that i think about it, i've found no better justification for becoming a christian, than i found in kierkegaard.

    the uniqueness of his style lies in his special technique, something like the socratic method; he would present a problem, lead you through the possible solutions, then he would ask you to choose... but he rarely asserted anything. rather, he asserted through you, the reader, by leading you without forcing you to believe anything without truly feeling you trusted it. the writing is never dry, but fluid, playful, seductive, and always good natured. it was as if kierkegaard was so certain of his superiority as a writer that he was afforded the privilege of being this way. he never worried that he wouldn't capture you, and when he played at being a pessimist and a cynic... it was just that, a play. all devices to penetrate and fascinate the reader.

    was he suffering inside? absolutely, and that was why he was also a master of comedy. what i mean is that ultimately kierkegaard, through a full recognition and acceptance of the absurd, transcended that depression through his dedication to what he believed, wholeheartedly and with total commitment.

    i've also often wondered if kierkegaard really believed in his christianity. i can imagine that he might have been telling a noble lie. maybe he looked at the world and realized that the world needed something to believe. and being that the christ, for him, was the symbol of perfection, he taught the world to aspire to be like him.

    i don't care anything about that nonsense. but i'd hangout with K in a minute, man, regardless. he was just out of time and place. too much for this world. too fucking deep. that danish hunchbacked mastermind with the golden pen.

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    Re: transgressive grammar

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